Crushed Stone

Determining What Size Crushed Stone You Need For Your Project

Crushed stone is used for a wide variety of projects, from building roads to providing suitable drainage and from laying a base for pavers to enhancing the look of landscaping projects. There are so many uses for this versatile material, yet many people are unsure of what size they need when it comes to selecting the proper material for their project.

If you are baffled by the many options and are unsure of what size you need, we’re here to help. We’ve put together a listing of common uses for each size of stone so you can get a better idea of what each is commonly used for. We will also gladly discuss your project with you to provide you with recommendations about what types of materials and sizes are most appropriate to meet your needs.

For starters, it’s important to note some of the most common uses for this type of material in general, no matter what the size. Common uses include:

Base layer for pavers, brick, blocks or concrete in applications such as patios, sidewalks and driveways
Mixed with asphalt
Landscaping – decorative and as base layer material
Drainage
Septic systems and dry wells

 

What exactly is this material, you may ask?  Crushed stone is quarried and processed from a virgin natural source of volcanic extrusion igneous basalt, also known as trap rock.

When it comes to sizes, you will find options that typically range from stone dust (screenings) to about 2 ½”. Here are the most commonly found sizes of crushed stone and what you can use them for:

Dust (screenings) – This is a 1/4″ minus material that can be used to fabricate concrete pavers or blocks or it can be used as a base for pavers or blocks. It is […]

By |February 19th, 2014|Blog|0 Comments|

What are the different Types of Gravel?

 Q-What are the different types of Gravel?

A-Multiple types of gravel have been recognized, including;

Bank gravel: gravel intermixed with sand or clay.

Bench gravel: a bed of gravel located on the side of a valley above the present stream bottom, indicating the former location of the stream bed when it was at a higher level.

Creek rock: This is generally rounded, semi-polished stones, potentially of a wide range of types, that are dredged or scooped from river beds and creek beds. It is also often used as concrete aggregate and less often as a paving surface.

Crushed Rock: Crushed Rock is mechanically broken into small pieces then sorted by filtering through different size mesh.

Crushed Stone: This is generally Limestone or dolomite that has been crushed and graded by screens to certain size classes. Hence the name “crushed stone”. It is widely used in concrete and as a surfacing for roads and driveways, “driveway gravel” sometimes with tar applied over it. Crushed stone may also be made from granite and other rocks. A special type of limestone crushed stone is dense grade aggregate, or DGA, also known as crusher run. This is a mixed grade of mostly small crushed stone in a matrix of crushed limestone powder. Crushed stone is is very commonly used for driveways. The most common sizes of crushed stone is range from 3/8 crushed stone, 5/8 crushed stone, 3/4 crushed stone, 1 1/2 crushed stone, 2 1/2 crushed stone. You may be able to find crushed stone in other sizes as well.

Fine gravel: gravel consisting of particles with a diameter of 1 to 2 mm.

Lag gravel: a surface accumulation of coarse gravel produced by the removal of finer particles.

Pay gravel: also known as “pay […]

What are the Types of Aggregate materials used in construction?

Q- What are the types of Aggregate materials used in the building and construction Industry?

A-Construction aggregate, or simply “aggregate”, is a broad category of coarse particulate material used in construction, including sand, gravel, crushed stone , slag, and recycled concrete .  Aggregates are a component of composite materials such as concrete and asphalt concrete; the aggregate serves as reinforcement to add strength to the overall composite material. Aggregates are also used as base material under foundations, roads, and railroads.The American Society for Testing and Materials publishes an exhaustive listing of specifications for various construction aggregate products, which, by their individual design, are suitable for specific construction purposes. These products include specific types of coarse and fine aggregate designed for such uses as additives to asphalt and concrete mixes, as well as other construction uses. State transportation departments further refine aggregate material specifications in order to tailor aggregate use to the needs and available supply in their particular locations. Sources for these basic materials can be grouped into three main areas:

Mining of mineral aggregate deposits, including sand, gravel and stone;
Use of waste slag from the manufacture of iron and steel;
Recycling of concrete , which is itself chiefly manufactured from mineral aggregates.
In addition, there are some (minor) materials that are used as specialty lightweight aggregates: clay, pumice, perlite, and vermiculite.
Defined by Wikipedia.com

Crushed Stone Uses

Crushed Stone
Crushed stone and or rocks supplied in the Northeast generally include 3/8″ Crushed Stone, 5/8″ Crushed Stone, 3/4″ Crushed Stone, 1 1/2″ Crushed Stone, 2 1/2″ Crushed Stone, Stone Screenings, and “DGA” Dense Graded Aggregate. All crushed stone materials have different uses and applications. Below is a brief overview of the different types of uses crushed stone has in the construction, building  and landscaping industries.
   

• Stone Dust or Stone Screenings – Stone Dust is used as a base for paving blocks & base for concrete paved roads and areas such as horse arenas

• 3/8″ Crushed Stone – 3/8 inch crushed stone is usually bluish to grayish in color. It is a clean stone that is used for driveways, drainage, and is often mixed with asphalt.

• 5/8″ Crushed Stone – 5/8 inch crushed stone generally has the same look and applications as 3/8 inch crushed stone, only it is slightly larger

• 3/4″ Crushed Stone – 3/4 inch Crushed Stone is also blue to gray in color, but its larger size has some additional uses. 3/4 inch Crushed Stone is used in driveways, but it is also used for around trees, landscaping, French drains, and as a sub-base for concrete sidewalks, concrete driveways, and patios,

• 1 1/2″ Crushed Stone – 1 1/2 inch Crushed Stone like most crushed stone, is blue or gray. It is primarily used for drainage, septic systems, and as a road base

• 2 1/2″ Crushed Stone – 2 1/2 inch Crushed Stone is blue or gray. These largest of the crushed stone products are used primarily for septic systems, & tracking pads on job sites.

• 3/4″ DGA – DGA or Dense Graded Aggregate is a combination of crushed stone and gravel created […]

By |January 3rd, 2007|Materials Usage|0 Comments|

Crushed Stone-Statistical Compendium by U.S. Geological Survey

Below is a statistacl report about crushed stone.

CRUSHED STONE

Statistical Compendium by U.S. Geological Survey, Minerals Information
Commodity Specialist: Valentin V. Tepordei (vteporde@usgs.gov) Last modification: 11/04/97

Stone, in its multitude of forms, represents a very significant part of the Earth’s crust and one of the most accessible natural resources. Stone has been used since the earliest days of our civilization, first as a tool or weapon, then as construction material, and later, in its crushed form, as one of the basic raw materials for a wide variety of uses ranging from agriculture and chemicals to complex industrial processes. At the beginning of the 20th century, the U.S. production of crushed stone was relatively small, and its uses limited. Today, crushed stone is being produced in 48 of the 50 States, and its annual production tonnage ranks first in the nonfuel minerals industry. The United States is, in general, self-sufficient in crushed stone, producing enough to meet most of the domestic needs. Small quantities of crushed stone, used mainly as construction aggregates, are being imported mostly by water from the Bahamas, Canada, and Mexico to compensate for local shortages that exist in some areas of the country.

The demand for crushed stone is determined mostly by the level of construction activity, and, therefore, the demand for construction materials. U.S. production of crushed stone recorded a significant growth in the past 40 years, from 229 million metric tons in 1950 to 1.1 billion metric tons in 1990. The highest level of production was reached in 1988–1.13 billion metric tons. Between 1950 and 1973, because of the construction of the Interstate Highway System, the growth from year to year in the production of crushed stone was almost continuous, paralleling the increased […]